Physics Of The Solar System – Vyazanitsyn et al

In this post, we will see the book Physics Of The Solar System (Vol 3 of A Course in Astrophysics and Stellar Astronomy) by V.P. Vyazanitsyn, M.N. Gnevyshev, O.V. Dobrovol’skii, V.A. Krat, A.V. Markov, A.P. Molchanov, V.M. Sobolev, V.V. Sharonov and edited by  A.A. Mikhailov.

About the book

This third volume of “A Course in Astrophysics and Stellar Astronomy” deals with observational results and their interpretation. It is not the aim of this book either to present all existing astrophysical theories and hypotheses or to discuss systematically general problems in the modern theories of cosmogony and cosmology. Such subjects have been treated in special textbooks and monographs. However, in all the astronomical literature so far there has been no book which gives a systematic presentation of observational results together with methods for their interpretation. This fact has determined the nature and the scope of this text. It mainly presents facts, and the principal theoretical studies related to an interpretation of the observational data are given only briefly (they are often just mentioned in the references). As far as possible, we have tried to avoid controversial theoretical questions for which no definite answers have yet been found, since this book does not represent a survey of astrophysics and stellar astronomy in the sense of the volumes edited by Kuiper on the sun and the solar system. Rather, it constitutes a textbook for young astronomers,
both graduates and undergraduates. For this reason, it was impossible to include a systematic discussion of general and complex problems related to cosmology and cosmogony, the proper place for which is in more specialized monographs.
For the teaching of astrophysics in a university, this book should be used in parallel with a course in theoretical astrophysics. Consequently, in our presentation it is assumed that the reader is already familiar with the rudiments of theory.
This volume, Volume III, is divided into two parts: 1) The Sun, and 2) The Planetary System (planets, comets, and meteors).
Part I mainly stresses so-called solar activity, that is, the processes occurring on the surface of the sun. These processes are inevitably interrelated, since they represent different stages in the development of large-scale motions on the solar surface. These motions produce so-called active regions, which in a certain sense may be compared with terrestrial cyclones and anticyclones.

The book was translated from Russian by the Israel Program for Scientific Translations
and was published in 1966 by NASA.

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You can get the book here.

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Contents

Part One
THE SUN

CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION
(V.P. Vyazanitsyn.) 3

§ 1. General data 3
§ 2. The total solar radiation 5
§ 3. Fluctuations in solar radiation 6
§ 4. The energy distribution in the solar spectrum 9
§ 5. Limb darkening 13
§ 6. Solar rotation 16

CHAPTER II. THE SOLAR LINE SPECTRUM
(V.P. Vyazanitsyn.) 19

§ 7. The Normal solar spectrum. Spectrum atlases and line catalogs 19
§ 8. The identification of Fraunhofer lines 22
§ 9. Equivalent Fraunhofer-line widths. Growth curves 25
§ 10. The quantitative composition of the solar atmosphere 32

CHAPTER III. THE STRUCTURE OF THE PHOTOSPHERE: GRANULATION, SUNSPOTS AND FACULAE
(V.A. Krat) 37

§ 11. The general appearance of the solar surface, Granulation 37
§ 12. Sunspots 43
§ 13. Solar rotation, as determined from spots and faculae 46
§ 14. Special features of the line spectra of spots and faculae 49
§ 15. Magnetic fields of spots. The general magnetic field of the sun 53
§ 16. Gas motion in sunspots. The Evershed effect 57
§ 17. The nature of sunspots 59
§ 18. The cyclic variation of photospheric phenomena 61
§ 19. The cyclic nature of sunspot formation 66

Chapter IV. THE CHROMOSPHERE
(V. P. Vyazanitsyn and V.M. Sobolev.) 68

§ 20. The flash spectrum, General properties of the chromosphere 68
§ 21. Spectrophotometric measurements and ee profiles 72
§ 22. The chemical composition of the chromosphere 77
§ 23. The density distribution with height in the chromosphere 79
§ 24. Self-absorption in the chromosphere 84
§ 25. The temperature and the electron concentration. Chromospheric models 89
§ 26. Chromospheric spicules 98
§ 27. The ultraviolet radiation of the chromosphere 101
§ 28. The theory of chromospheric heating 103
§ 29. Bright flocculi 107

Chapter V. PROMINENCES
(V.P. Vyazanitsyn and V.M.Sobolev.) 111

§ 30. Historical remarks 111
§ 31. Statistical data 112
§ 32. Filaments 114
§ 33. The classification of prominences 116
§ 34. The dynamics of prominences 123
§ 35. Prominence spectra. Spectrophotometric measurements 125
§ 36. Excitation and ionization 130

Chapter VI. CHROMOSPHERIC FLARES
(V.A. Krat.) 134

§ 37. Classification. Frequency of flares 134
§ 38. The formation of surges 136
§ 39. The spectra of chromospheric flares and their interpretation 137
§ 40. Emission cores 141
§ 41. Geoactivity and the nature of lane 144

Chapter VII. THE SOLAR CORONA
(V.A. Krat) 148

§ 42. The continuous spectrum of the corona 148
§ 43. The line spectrum of the corona 151
§ 44. The brightness and polarization of the corona 153
§ 45. Structural features of the corona in “white” light 155
§ 46. The ionization and excitation of atoms in the corona 156
§ 47. Profiles of coronal lines. The structure of the corona in monochromatic emission of spectral lines 158
§ 48. Coronal motions. The development of coronal condensations 162
§ 49. The corona and the chromosphere 163

Chapter VII. THE SOLAR SURVEY
(M.N. Gnevyshev.) 169

§ 50. A definition of the term “Solar Survey” 169
§ 51. Photospheric solar-activity indexes 171
§ 52. Chromospheric solar-activity indexes 175
§ 53. Coronal solar-activity indexes 178
§ 54. Solar radio-emission indexes 179

Chapter IX. SOLAR RADIO EMISSION
(A.P. Molchanov.) 182

§ 55. Methods of observation 182
§ 56. A general description of solar radio emission 185
§ 57. The undisturbed component of the solar radio emission 186
§ 58. The slowly varying disturbed component of the solar radio emission 208
§ 59. The rapidly varying disturbed component (radio bursts) 228

PART TWO
THE PLANETARY SYSTEM

Chapter X. THE MOON
(A.V.Markov.) 238

§ 60. The moon as a celestial body 238
§ 61. Photometric and polarization properties of the lunar surface 241
§ 62. Studies of the temperature of the lunar crust using heat receivers and radio methods 246
§ 63. Endogenous and exogenous hypotheses of lunar-relief formation 255
§ 64. Maps of the other side of the moon 259

Chapter XII. PHYSICS OF THE PLANETS
(V.V.Sharonov.) 264

§ 65. Introduction 264
§ 66. The planetary disk 265
§ 67. Methods of observing planetary features 266
§ 68. Methods of disk measurement 267
§ 69. Phases 269
§ 70. Planetographic coordinates of surface points 270
§ 71. The rotation elements and their observational determination 272
§ 72. Spectroscopic studies of rotation 274
§ 73. The disk of a considerably flattened planet 277
§ 74. Planetary characteristics related to the mass 279
§ 75. The brightness, magnitude, and color of a planet 281
§ 76. Reflectivity 283
§ 77. Albedo 285
§ 78. The application of surface photometry to disks of planets and satellites 288
§ 79. Structures of planetary atmospheres 289
§ 80. Optical phenomena in planetary atmospheres 292
§ 81. Temperature conditions 294
§ 82. Planetary radio astronomy 296

 

Chapter XII. A DESCRIPTION OF INDIVIDUAL PLANETS
(V.V.Sharonov.) 299

§ 83. Mercury 299
§ 84. Venus 300
§ 85. The earth 306
§ 86. Mars 308
§ 87. Jupiter 314
§ 88. Saturn and its rings 318
§ 89. Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto 321
§ 90. Planetary satellites 324

 

Chapter XIII. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE MINOR PLANETS
(A.V. Markov.) 328

§ 91. Orbits of the minor planets we 328
§ 92. Physical properties of the minor planets 329
§ 93. The origin of the minor planets 333

Chapter XIV. COMETS, METEORS, AND THE ZODIACAL LIGHT
(O.V. Dobrovol’skii.) 336

§ 94. General data on comets 336
§ 95. Cometary nuclei 342
§ 96. Cometary spectra 347
§ 97. The apparent brightness a a comet. Masses and densities of cometary atmospheres 358
§ 98. Differentiation of matter in a cometary atmosphere under the influence of solar heat 361
§ 99. Type-1 tails 363
§ 100. The origin of comets 369
§ 101. Some unsolved problems in the physics of comets 369
§ 102. General data on meteors 370
§ 103. Elements of the physical theory of meteors 373
§ 104. The results of photographic observations of meteors 375
§ 105. Spectra of meteors 379
§ 106. Radar observations of meteors 381
§ 107. The latest research techniques 386
§ 108. General data on the zodiacal 387
§ 109. The nature of the zodiacal light 389

INDEX 393

 

 

 

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1 Response to Physics Of The Solar System – Vyazanitsyn et al

  1. Pingback: Physics Of The Solar System – Vyazanitsyn et al — Mir Books | Chet Aero Marine

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