A Modern Handbook of Physics – Yavorsky and Detlaf

In this post, we will see the much-awaited book A Modern Handbook of Physics by B. M. Yavorksy and A. A. Detlaf.

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About the book (From the Preface)

The basic sciences and physics, in particular, are of prime importance today in the training of engineers for the various branches of the national economy. This has led to fundamental changes in recent years in the teaching of physics in engineering institutes, and to the students of other educational institutions in which they do not major in physics. The scope and scientific level of physics courses have been substantially supplemented and cover the main trends in the development of modern physics. Consequently, the physics textbooks for engineering students have inevitably become three-volume editions of almost fifteen hundred pages. The need has arisen, in this connection, for a concise handbook on this subject.

The aim of the authors was to fulfill this need. In scope and depth this handbook includes all of the definitions, formulas and information covered in the most comprehensive and up-to-date physics courses of engineering institutes
and the physics departments of universities and colleges. Physical laws are concisely formulated, all the necessary explanations are given and, in many cases, derivations as well. Though it plays a vital role in the teaching of physics, experimental material has been omitted. This is due only to a lack of space. All the units and symbols comply with the requirements of the SI Units of physical quantities and systems of units are listed and dealt with in a short appendix.

This handbook is designed primarily for engineering students, as well as college and university students studying, but not majoring in physics. It can be used to advantage by engineers and graduate students, as well as by instructors and lecturers of intermediate schools and colleges.

Mathematical knowledge required in using the handbook is within the scope of the ordinary mathematics courses of engineering institutes. The detailed index and the numerous cross references, indicating the chapter, section and subsection, are of aid in finding any required information.

The book was translated from the Russian by Nicholas Weinstein and was published by Mir in 1982. This is called the “Modern” handbook, as there exists another “Handbook of Physics” by the same authors which is about 1000 pages long.

PDF | OCR | Bookmarked | 300 dpi (upscaled to 600) | Paginated

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Contents

Front Cover 1
Title Page 7
Contents 9
Preface 21

PART ONE MECHANICS 23

CHAPTER 1 KINEMATICS 23
1.1 Mechanical Motion. The Subject Matter of Mechanics 23
1.2 Frames of Reference. Path, Path Length and Displacement Vector of a Particle 24
1.3 Velocity 28
1.4 Acceleration 31
1.5 Translational and Rotary Motion of a Rigid Body 33

CHAPTER 2 NEWTON’S LAWS 38
2.1 Newton’s First Law. Inertial Frames of Reference 38
2.2 Force 39
2.3 Mass. Momentum 42
2.4 Newton’s Second Law 44
2.5 Newton’s Third Law. Motion of the Centre of Mass 46
2.6 Motion of a Body of Variable Mass 48
2.7 Law of Conservation of Momentum 50
2.8 Galilean Transformations. Mechanical Principle of Relativity 52

CHAPTER 3 WORK AND MECHANICAL ENERGY 55
3.1 Energy, Work and Power 55
3.2 Kinetic Energy 60
3.3 Potential Energy 63
3.4 Law of Conservation of Mechanical Energy 67
3.5 Perfectly Elastic and Inelastic Collisions 70

CHAPTER 4 DYNAMICS OF ROTARY MOTION 74
4.1 Moment of Force and Angular Momentum 74
4.2 Moment of Inertia 78
4.3 The Fundamental Law in the Dynamics of Rotary Motion 81
4.4 Law of Conservation of Angular Momentum 85

CHAPTER 5 FUNDAMENTALS OF THE SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY 88
5.1 Postulates of the Special Theory of Relativity 88
5.2 Simultaneity of Events. Synchronization of Clocks 91
5.3 Lorentz’s Transformations 93
5.4 Relativity of Lengths and Time Intervals. Time Interval Between Two Events 94 453
5.5 Transformation of Velocities and Accelerations in Relativistic Kinematics 100
5.6 Basic Law of Relativistic Dynamics 103
5.7 Mass-Energy Relation 105

CHAPTER 6 GRAVITATION 108
6.1 Law of Universal Gravitation 108
6.2 Gravitational Field 111
6.3 Kepler’s Laws. Space Velocities 116

CHAPTER 7 MOTION IN NONINERTIAL FRAMES OF REFERENCE 119
7.1 Kinematics of Relative Motion 119
7.2 Inertial Forces 121
7.3 Relative Motion in a Frame of Reference Fixed to the Earth. Gravity Force and Weight of a Body 123
7.4 Principle of Equivalence 127

PART TWO FUNDAMENTALS OF MOLECULAR PHYSICS AND THERMODYNAMICS 130

CHAPTER 8 IDEAL GASES 130
8.1 Subject Matter of Molecular Physics.Thernal Motion 130
8.2 Statistical and Thermodynamic Methods of Investigation 131
8.3 Thermodynamic Variables. Equations of State. Thermodynamic Processes 133
8.4 Equation of State of an Ideal Gas 136

CHAPTER 9 FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 138
9.1 Total and Internal Energy of a System 138
9.2 Heat and Work 141
9.3 First Law of Thermodynamics 144
9.4 Graphical Representation of Thermodynamic Processes and Work 145
9.5 Heat Capacity of Matter. Applying the First Law of Thermodynamics to Isoprocesses in an Ideal Gas 147

CHAPTER 10 KINETIC THEORY OF GASES 155
10.1 Certain Information on Classical Statistical Physics 155
10.2 Basic Equation of the Kinetic Theory of Gases 156
10.3 Maxwell’s Molecular Velocity and Energy Distribution Law (Maxwell’s Distribution Law) 158
10.4 Particle Distribution in a Potential Force Field (Boltzmann Distribution) 163
10.5 Mean Free Path of Molecules 165
10.6 Principle of the Equipartition of Energy. Internal Energy of an Ideal Gas 166
10.7 Heat Capacity of Monatomic, Diatomic and Polyatomic Gases 169
10.8 Transport Phenomena in Gases 174
10.9 Properties of Rarified Gases 179

CHAPTER 11 SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS 181
11.1 Cycles. The Carnot Cycle 181
11.2 Reversible and Irreversible Processes 185
11.3 Second Law of Thermodynamics 186
11.4 Entropy and Free Energy 189
11.5 Statistical Interpretation of the Second Law of Thermodynamics 192
11.6 Fluctuations 193
11.7 Brownian Movement 196
11.8 Third Law of Thermodynamics 197

CHAPTER 12 REAL GASES AND VAPOURS 198
12.1 Forces of Intermolecular Interaction 198
12.2 Van der Waals Equation of State 204
12.3 Isothermals of Real Gases. Phase Transitions 206
12.4 Superfluidity of Helium 209

CHAPTER 13 LIQUIDS 211
13.1 Certain Properties of Liquids 211
13.2 Frenkel’s Hole Theory of the Liquid State 212
13.3 Diffusion and Viscosity Phenomena in Liquids 214
13.4 Surface Tension of Liquids 215
13.5 Wetting and Capillary Phenomena 217
13.6 Vaporization and Boiling of Liquids 221

PART THREE ELECTRODYNAMICS 224

CHAPTER 14 ELECTRIC CHARGES. COULOMB’S LAW 224
14.1 Introduction 224
14.2 Coulomb’s Law 225

CHAPTER 15 ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH AND DISPLACEMENT 228
15.1 Electric Field. Field Strength 228
15.2 Principle of Superposition of Electric Fields 230
15.3 Electric Displacement. Ostrogradsky-Gauss Electric Flux Theorem 234

CHAPTER 16 ELECTRIC FIELD POTENTIAL 238
16.1 Work Done in Moving an Electric Charge in an Electrostatic Field 238
16.2 Potential of an Electrostatic Field 240
16.3 Relation Between the Potential and Strength of an Electrostatic field 244
16.4 Conductors in an Electrostatic Field 246

CHAPTER 17 CAPACITANCE 248
17.1 Capacitance of an Isolated Conductor 248
17.2 Mutual Capacitance. Capacitors 249

CHAPTER 18 DIELECTRICS IN AN ELECTRIC FIELD 253
18.1 Dipole Moments of Molecules of a Dielectric 253
18.2 Polarization of Dielectrics 255
18.3 Relation Between Displacement, Field Strength and Polarization Vectors 259
18.4 Ferroelectric Materials 261

CHAPTER 19 ENERGY OF AN ELECTRIC FIELD 264
19.1 Energy of a Charged Conductor and an Electric Field 264
19.2 Energy of a Polarized Dielectric 267

CHAPTER 20 DIRECT ELECTRIC CURRENT 268
20.1 Concept of an Electric Current 268
20.2 Current and Current Density 269
20.3 Fundamentals of the Classical Electron Theory of Electrical Conduction in Metals 271

CHAPTER 21 DIRECT CURRENT LAWS 274
21.1 Extraneous Forces 274
21.2 Ohm’s Law and the Joule-Lenz Law 275
21.3 KirchhoH’s Laws 279

CHAPTER 22 ELECTRIC CURRENT IN LIQUIDS ND GASES 282
22.1 Faraday’s Laws of Electrolysis. Electrolytic Dissociation 282
22.2 Atomicity of Electric Charges 284
22.3 Electrolytic Conduction of Liquids 284
22.4 Electrical Conduction in Gases 286
22.5 Various Types of Gas Discharges 287
22.6 Certain Information on Plasma 290

CHAPTER 23 MAGNETIC FIELD OF DIRECT CURRENT 294
23.1 Magnetic Field. Ampere’s Law 294
23.2 The Biot-Savarf-Laplace Law 296
23.3 Simplest Cases of Magnetic Fields Set Up by Direct Currents 300
23.4 Interaction of Conductors. Effect of a Magnetic Field on Current-Carrying Conductors 306
23.5 Total Current Law. Magnetic Circuits 308
23.6 Work Done in Moving a Current-Carrying Conductor in a Magnetic Field 312

CHAPTER 24 MOTION OF CHARGED PARTICLES IN ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS 314
24.1 Lorentz Force 314
24.2 Hall Effect 318
24.3 Charge-fo-Mass Ratio of Particles. Mass Spectroscopy 321
24.4 Charged Particle Accelerators 322

CHAPTER 25 ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION 327
25.1 Basic Law of Electromagnetic Induction 327
25.2 Phenomenon of Self-Induction 331
25.3 Mutual Induction 334
25.4 Energy of a Magnetic Field Set up by an Electric Current 336

CHAPTER 26 MAGNETIC MATERIALS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD 339
26.1 Magnetic Moments of Electrons and Atoms 339
26.2 An Atom in a Magnetic Field 341
26.3 Diamagnetic and Paramagnetic Materials in a Uniform Magnetic Field 344
26.4 Magnetic Field in Magnetic Materials 348
26.5 Ferromagnetic Materials 350

CHAPTER 27 FUNDAMENTALS OF MAXWELL S THEORY 354
27.1 General Features o! Maxwell’s Theory 354
27,2 Maxwell’s First Equation 355
27.3 Displacement Current. Maxwell’s Second Equation 357
27.4 Complete Set of Maxwell’s Equations for an Electromagnetic Field 361

PART FOUR OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES 366

CHAPTER 28 FREE HARMONIC OSCILLATIONS 366
28.1 Harmonic Oscillations 366
28.2 Mechanical Harmonic Vibrations 370
23.3 Free Harmonic Oscillations in an Oscillatory Electric Circuit 376
28.4 Adding Harmonic Oscillations 378

CHAPTER 29 DAMPED AND FORCED OSCILLATIONS 388
29.1 Damped Oscillations 388
29.2 Forced Mechanical Vibration 392
29.3 Forced Electrical Oscillation 397

CHAPTER 30 ELASTIC WAVES 402
30.1 Longitudinal and Transverse Waves in an Elastic Medium 402
30.2 Travelling Wave Equation 405
30.3 Phase Velocity and Energy of Elastic Waves 410
30.4 Principle of Superposition of Waves. Group Velocity
30.5 Interference of Waves. Standing Waves 418
30.6 Doppler Effect in Acoustics 424

CHAPTER 31 ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES 426
31.1 Properties of Electromagnetic Waves 426
31.2 Energy of Electromagnetic Waves 431
31.3 Electromagnetic Radiation 434
31.4 Electromagnetic Spectrum 437
31.5 Reflection and Refraction of Electromagnetic Waves at the Interface Between Two Dielectric Media 439
31.6 Doppler Effect 444

PART FIVE OPTICS 448

CHAPTER 32 INTERFERENCE OF LIGHT 448
32.1 Monochromaticity and Time Coherence of Light 448
32.2 Interference of Light. Spatial Coherence of Light 450
32.3 Interference of Light in Thin Films 457
32.4 Multiwave Interference 461

CHAPTER 33 DIFFRACTION OF LIGHT 465
33.1 Huygens-Fresnel Principle 465
33.2 Fresnel Diffraction 469
33.3 Fraunhofer Diffraction 471
33.4 Diffraction by a Space Lattice 478
33.5 Resolving Power of Optical Instruments 480
33.6 Holography 482

CHAPTER 34 ABSORPTION, SCATTERING AND DISPERSION OF LIGHT. VAVILOV-CHERENKOV RADIATION 485
34.1 Interaction of Light With Matter 485
34.2 Absorption of Light 486
34.3 Scattering of Light 489
24.4 Normal and Anomalous Light Dispersion 491
34.5 Classical Electron Theory of Light Dispersion 493
34.6 Vavilov-Cherenkov Radiation 496

CHAPTER 35 POLARIZATION OF LIGHT 499
35.1 Polarization of Light in Reflection and Refraction at the Interface Between Two Dielectric Media 499
35.2 Birefringence (Double Refraction) 502
35.3 Interference of Polarized Light 508
35.4 Artificial Optical Anisotropy 512
35.5 Rotation of the Plane of Polarization 514

CHAPTER 36 THERMAL RADIATION 515
36.1 Thermal Radiation. Kirchhoff’s Law 515
36.2 Sfefan-Boltzmann and Wien Laws 520
36.3 Planck’s Formula 522
36.4 Optical Pyrometry 526

CHAPTER 37 FUNDAMENTALS OF QUANTUM OPTICS 528
37.1 External Photoelectric Effect (Photoemissive Effect) 528
37.2 Mass and Momentum of the Photon. Light Pressure 532
37.3 Compton Effect 534
37.4 Wave-Particle Duality of the Properties of Light 537

PART SIX ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS 539

CHAPTER 38 ELEMENTS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS 539
38.1 Wave-Particle Dualism of the Properties of Particles of Matter 539
33.2 Schrodinger Wave Equation 542
38.3 Motion of a Free Particle 544
38.4 A Particle in a One-Dimensional Infinitely Deep Potential Well 545
38.5 Linear Harmonic Oscillator 547
38.6 Heisenberg Indeterminacy Principle 552
38.7 Tunnel Effect 555

CHAPTER 39 STRUCTURE OF ATOMS AND MOLECULES AND THEIR OPTICAL PROPERTIES 558
39.1 The Hydrogen Atom and Hydrogen-Like Ions 558
39.2 Space Quantization 563
39.3 Pauli Exclusion Principle. Mendeleev’s Periodic Table 565
39.4 Chemical Bonds and Molecular Structure 567
39.5 Optical Properties of Molecules. Molecular Spectra 570
39.6 Raman Scattering of Light 572
39.7 Luminescence. X rays 574
39.8 Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers 577

PART SEVEN BASIC SOLID-STATE PHYSICS 583

CHAPTER 40 STRUCTURE AND CERTAIN PROPERTIES OF SOLIDS 583
40.1 Structure of Solids 583
40.2 Thermal Expansion of Solids 584
40.3 Brief Information on the Elastic Properties of Solids 586
40.4 Basic Concepts of Phase Transitions in Solids 589

CHAPTER 41 AN OUTLINE OF THE QUANTUM PHYSICS OF SOLIDS 592
41.1 Basic Concepts of Quantum Statistics 592
41.2 Bose-Einsfein and Fermi-Dirac Distribution Functions 593
41.3 Degeneracy of Systems of Particles Described by Quantum Statistics 596
41.4 Degenerate Electron Fermi Gas in Metals 598
41.5 Quantum Theory of Electrical Conduction in Metals 602
41.6 Superconductivity 605
41.7 Heat Capacity of Solids 609
41.8 Band Theory of Solids 614
41.9 Metals and Dielectrics in the Band Theory 618
41.10 Electrical Conduction of Semiconductors 619
41.11 Concept of Contact Electrical Phenomenon Metals and Semiconductors 624

PART EIGHT NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND ELEMENTARY PARTICLES 630

CHAPTER 42 STRUCTURE AND BASIC PROPERTIES OF ATOMIC NUCLEI 630
42.1 Main Properties and Structure of the Nucleus 630
42.2 Binding Energy of Nuclei. Mass Defect 632
42.3 Nuclear Forces 635
42.4 Radioactivity 637
42.5 Alpha Decay 641
42.6 Beta Decay 643
42.7 Gamma Rays 646
42.8 Mossbauer Effect 649
42.9 Nuclear Reactions 652

CHAPTER 43 ELEMENTARY PARTICLES 662
43.1 Preliminary Information on Elementary Particles 662
43.2 Classification of Elementary Particles and Their Interaction 666
43.3 Certain Information on Various Elementary Particles 669
43.4 Certain Conservation Laws in Elementary-Particle Physics 672
43.5 Antiparticles 675
43.6 Structure of the Nucleon 677

PART NINE APPENDICES 680

I. SYSTEMS OF UNITS OF PHYSICAL QUANTITIES 680

II. FUNDAMENTAL PHYSICAL CONSTANTS 694

INDEX 699

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1 Response to A Modern Handbook of Physics – Yavorsky and Detlaf

  1. delenda says:

    Lovely panoramics of physics. Thanks a lot. Reminds me of Kitaigorodsky “Introduction To Physics” for the choice of subjects, only a little more sophisticated.
    Unfortunately this scan has a hair drifting on odd pages from 581 to 635; you may consider rescanning those pages.

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