Elementary Textbook on Physics Vol 1 – Landsberg

In this post, we will see Elementary Textbook on Physics – Volume 1 – Mechanics, Heat and Molecular Physics edited by G. S. Landsberg.

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About the book:

Volume 1 covers aspects of basic mechanics and fluid mechanics (both statics and dynamics), heat and molecular physics. These topics include:

Kinematics. Dynamics. Statics. Work and Energy. Curvilinear Motion. Motion in Noninertial Reference Systems and inertial Forces. Hydrostatics. Aerostatics. Fluid Dynamics. Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids. Work. Heat. Law of Energy Conservation. Molecular Theory. Properties of Gases. Properties of Liquids. Properties of Solids. Transition from Solid to Liquid State. Elasticity and Strength. Properties of Vapours. Physics of the Atmosphere. Heat Engines.

 

About the series (from Front Jacket and Preface):

Elementary Textbook on Physics first appeared in 1948-52 under the editorship of Academician G.S. Landsberg (1890-1957) and immediately became popular with students preparing for entrance examinations in physics. The success of the book was due very much to the fact that each section was written by a specialist. Contributors to the book included the scientists S.E. Khaikin, M.A. Isakovich, M.A. Leontovich, D.I. Sakharov (Vol. 1), S.G. Kalashnikov (Vol. 2), S.M. Rytov, M.M. Sushchinskii (with the participation of I.A. Yakovlev), F.S. Landsberg-Baryshanskaya, and F.L. Shapiro (Vol. 3).

These three volumes form a course on elementary physics that has become very popular in the Soviet Union. Each sectioh was written by an authority in the appropriate field, while the overall unity and editing was supervised by Academician G.S. Landsberg (1890-1957). This textbook has gone through ten Russian editions and a great deal of effort went into the last edition to introduce SI units and change the terminology and notation for the physical units.

A feature of this course is the relatively small number of formulas and mathematical manipulations. Instead, attention was focussed on explaining physical phenomena in such a way as to combine scientific rigour and a form understandable to school children. Another aspect of the text is the technological application of the physical laws.

These features make the text a world-class textbook.

For students preparing to enter universities and colleges to study physics, and for those it high schools specialising in physics.

The book was translated from the Russian by Natalia Wadhwa and was first published by Mir in 1988.

 

The Internet Archive Link Vol 1

The Internet Archive Link Vol 2

The Internet Archive Link Vol 3

Contents Vol 1

Front Cover 1
Front Jacket 2
Title Page 7
Contents 9
From the Preface to the First Russian Edition 15
From the Publishers of the Tenth Russian Edition 18
Introduction 20
Part One Mechanics 23
Chapter 1 Kinematics 23
1.1. Motion of Bodies 23
1.2. Kinematics. Relative Nature of Motion and State of Rest 25
1.3. Trajectory of Motion 26
1.4. Translatory and Rotary Motion of a Body 28
1.5. Motion of a Point 29
1.6. Description of Motion of a Point 30
1.7. Measurement of Length 33
1.8. Measurement of Time Intervals 36
1.9. Uniform Rectilinear Motion and Its Velocity 38
1.10 The Sign of Velocity in Rectilinear Motion 40
1.11. Units of Velocity 40
1.12. Path vs. Time Graph 43
1.13. Velocity vs. Time Graph 47
1.14. Nonuniform Rectilinear Motion. Average Velocity 48
1.15. Instantaneous Velocity 49
1.16. Acceleration in Rectilinear Motion 51
1.17. Velocity of Uniformly Accelerated Motion in a Straight Line 53
1.18. The Sign of Acceleration in Rectilinear Motion 54
1.19. Velocity Graphs for Uniformly Accelerated Motion in a Straight Line 55
1.20. Velocity Graph for an Arbitrary Nonuniform Motion 56
1.21. Calculation of the Path Traversed in Nonuniform Motion with the Help of Velocity Graph 58
1.23. Vectors 60
1.24. Decomposition of a Vector into Components 64
1.25. Curvilinear Motion 67
1.26. Velocity of Curvilinear Motion 67
1.27. Acceleration in Curvilinear Motion 69
1.28. Motion in Different Reference Systems 71
1.29. Kinematics of Motion in Outer Space 73
Chapter 2 Dynamics 76
2.1. Problems of Dynamics 76
2.2. Law of Inertia 76
2.3. Inertial Reference Systems 79
2.4. Galileo’s Relativity Principle 79
2.5. Forces 80
2.6. Balanced Forces. State of Rest and Inertial Motion 82
2.7. Force as a Vector. Standard of Force 83
2.8. Spring Balance 84
2.9. The Point of Application of a Force 87
2.10. Resultant Force 88
2.11. Composition of Forces Acting along a Straight Line 88
2.12. Composition of Forces Acting at an Angle to Each Other 89
2.13. Relation between Force and Acceleration 91
2.14. Mass of a Body 93
2.15. Newton’s Second Law 95
2.16. Units of Force and Mass 98
2.17. Systems of Units 99
2.18. Newton’s Third Law 99
2.19. Applications of Newton’s Third Law 102
2.20. Momentum of a Body 104
2.21. System of Bodies. Law of Momentum Conservation 105
2.22. Application of the Law of Momentum Conservation 107
2.23. Free Fall of Bodies 109
2.24. Free Fall Acceleration 110
2.25. Falling of a Body with Zero Initial Velocity and Motion of a Body Thrown Vertically Upwards 110
2.26. Weight of a Body 112
2.27. Mass and Weight 114
2.28. Density of Substances 115
2.29. Emergence of Deformations 116
2.30. Deformations in Stationary Bodies Caused Only by Contact Forces 117
2.31. Deformations in Stationary Bodies Caused by the Force of Gravity 118
2.32. Deformation of a Body Moving with an Acceleration 119
2.33. Vanishing of Deformations in Free Fail 121
2.34. Destruction of Moving Bodies 123
2.35. Frictional Forces 124
2.36. Rolling Friction 127
2.37. Role of Friction 128
2.38. Resistance of Medium 129
2.39. Falling of Bodies in Air 130
Chapter 3 Statics 133
3.1. Problems of Statics 133
3.2. Perfectly Rigid Body 134
3.3. Translation of the Point of Application of a Force Acting on a Rigid Body 135
3.4. Equilibrium of a Body under the Action of Three Forces 137
3.5. Decomposition of Forces 138
3.6. Projections of Forces. General Conditions of Equilibrium 141
3.7. Constraints. Constraining Forces. A Body with a Fixed Axis 143
3.8. Equilibrium of a Body with a Fixed Axis 145
3.9. Moment of Force 146
3.10. Measurement of Torque 149
3.11. Force Couple 150
3.12. Composition of Parallel Forces. Centre of Gravity 151
3.13. Determination of the Centre of Gravity of a Body 154
3.14. Equilibrium of a Body under the Action of the Force of Gravity 157
3.15. Conditions of Stable Equilibrium under the Action of the Force of Gravity 159
3.16. Simple Machines 162
3.17. Wedge and Screw 168
Chapter 4 Work and Energy 172
4.1. “Golden Rule” of Mechanics 172
4.2. Applications of the “Golden Rule” 173
4.3. Work Done by a Force 174
4.4. Work Done during a Displacement Normal to the Direction of Force 176
4.5. Work Done by a Force Acting at an Arbitrary Angle to Displacement 176
4.6. Positive and Negative Work 177
4.7. Units of Work 178
4.8. Motion over a Horizontal Plane 179
4.9. Work Done by the Force of Gravity in Motion over an Inclined Plane 179
4.10. Principle of Work Conservation 180
4.11. Energy 182
4.12. Potential Energy 183
4.13. Potential Energy of Elastic Deformation 185
4.14. Kinetic Energy 187
4.15. Kinetic Energy in Terms of Mass and Velocity of a Body 187
4.16. Total Energy of a Body 188
4.17. The Law of Energy Conservation 190
4.18. Frictional Forces and the Law of Conservation of Mechanical Energy 193
4.19. Conversion of Mechanical Energy into Internal Energy 194
4.20. General Nature of the Law of Energy Conservation 196
4.21. Power 197
4.22. Calculation of Power of Machines 198
4.23. Power
4.24. Efficiency of Machines 200
Chapter 5 Curvilinear Motion 202
5.1. Emergence of Curvilinear Motion 202
5.2. Acceleration of a Curvilinear Motion 203
5.3. Motion of a Body Thrown along the Horizontal 204
5.4. Motion of a Body Thrown at an Angle to the Horizontal 207
5.5. Flight of Bullets and Projectiles 210
5.6. Angular Velocity 211
5.7. Forces in a Uniform Circular Motion 212
5.8. Emergence of the Force Acting on a Body Moving in a Circle 214
5.9. Rupture of Flywheels 216
5.10. Deformation of a Body Moving in a Circle 217
5.11. Roller Coaster 219
5.12. Banking of Tracks 221
5.13. The Circular Motion of a Suspended Body 222
5.14. Motion of Planets 223
5.15. The Law of Universal Gravitation 227
5.16. Artificial Satellites of the Earth 231
Chapter 6 Motion in Noninertial Reference Systems and Inertial Forces 239
6.1. The Role of a Reference System 239
6.2. Motion Relative to Different Inertial Systems 240
6.3. Motion Relative to an Inertial and a Noninertial Reference System 241
6.4. Noninertial Systems in Translatory Motion 243
6.5. Inertial Forces 243
6.6. Equivalence of Inertial Forces and Gravitational Forces 245
6.7. Weightlessness and Overloads 248
6.8. Is the Earth an Inertial Reference System? 250
6.9. Rotating Reference Systems 251
6.10. Inertial Forces for a Body Moving Relative to a Rotating Reference System 253
6.11. Proof of the Earth’s Rotation 254
6.12. Tides 257
Chapter 7 Hydrostatics 259
7.1. Mobility of Liquids 259
7.2. Force of Pressure 260
7.3. Measurement of Compressibility of a Liquid 262
7.4. “Incompressible” Liquid 263
7.5. Forces of Pressure Are Transmitted in a Liquid in All Directions 263
7.6. Direction of Forces of Pressure 264
7.7. Pressure 264
7.8. Membrane Manometer 265
7.9. Independence of Pressure of the Orientation of an Area Element 266
7.10. Units of Pressure 267
7.11. Determination of Forces of Pressure from Pressure 267
7.12. Distribution of Pressure in a Liquid 268
7.13. Pascal’s Principle 269
7.14. Hydraulic Press 270
7.15. Liquid under the Action of the Force of Gravity 272
7.16. Communicating Vessels 276
7.17. Liquid Column Manometer 278
7.18. Water Supply System. Pressure Pump 279
7.19. Siphon 281
7.20. Force of Pressure on the Bottom of a Vessel 282
7.21. Water Pressure in Sea Depths 285
7.22. The Strength of a Submarine 288
7.23. Archimedes’ Principle 289
7.24. Measurement of Density of Bodies on the Basis of Archimedes’ Principle 293
7.25. Floatation of Bodies 293
7.26. Floatation of Hollow Bodies 296
7.27. Stability of Floating Ships 298
7.28. Rising of Bubbles to the Surface 299
7.29. Bodies Lying on the Bottom of a Vessel 299
Chapter 8 Aerostatics 301
8.1. Mechanical Properties of Gases 301
8.2. Atmosphere 302
8.3. Atmospheric Pressure 303
8.4. Other Experiments Confirming the Existence of the Atmospheric Pressure 305
8.5. Vacuum Pumps 308
8.6. Effect of the Atmospheric Pressure on the Level of Liquid in a Pipe 308
8.7. Maximum Height of a Liquid Column 310
8.8. Torricelli’s Experiment. Mercury Barometer and Aneroid Barometer 312
8.9. Distribution of Atmospheric Pressure over Altitude 315
8.10. Physiological Effect of Lowered Air Pressure 318
8.11. Archimedes’ Principle for Gases 318
8.12. Balloons and Airships 319
8.13. Application of Compressed Air in Engineering 321
Chapter 9 Fluid Dynamics 324
9.1. Pressure in a Fluid Flow 324
9.2. Fluid Flow in Pipes. Fluid Friction 326
9.3. Bernoulli’s Law 329
9.4. Fluid in Noninertial Reference Systems 331
9.5. Reaction of a Moving Fluid and Its Application 333
9.6. Motion over Water Surface 336
9.7. Rockets 338
9.9. Ballistic Missiles 340
9.10. Launching a Rocket from the Earth 342
9.11. Air Resistance. Resistance of Water 342
9.12. Magnus Effect and Circulation 346
9.14. Turbulence in a Fluid Flow 351
9.15. Laminar Flow 352
Part Two Heat. Molecular Physics 353
Chapter 10 Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids 353
10.1. Thermal Expansion of Solids and Liquids 353
10.2. Thermometers 357
10.3. Formula of Linear Expansion 359
10.4. Formula for Volume Expansion 361
10.5. Relation between Temperature Coefficients of Linear and Volume Expansion 363
10.6. Measurement of Temperature Coefficient of Volume Expansion for Liquids 364
10.7. Thermal Expansion of Water 364
Chapter 11 Work. Heat. Law of Energy Conservation 366
11.1. Change of the State of Bodies 366
11.2. Heating of Bodies on Which Work Is Done 367
11.3. The Change in the Internal Energy in Heat Transfer 369
11.4. Units of Heat 370
11.5. Dependence of Internal Energy of a Body on Its Mass and Substance of Which It Is Made Up 371
11.6. Heat Capacity of a Body 372
11.7. Specific Heat Capacity 373
11.8. Calorimeter. Measurement of Heat Capacity 373
11.9. The Law of Energy Conservation 376
11.10. Perpetual-Motion Machine (Perpetuum Mobile) 378
11.11. Types of Processes Involving Heat Transfer 378
Chapter 12 Molecular Theory 383
12.1. Molecules and Atoms 383
12.2. Size of Atoms and Molecules 384
12.3. Microworld 385
12.4. Internal Energy from the Viewpoint of Molecular Theory 386
12.5. Molecular Motion 387
12.6. Molecular Motion in Gases
12.7. Brownian Movement 389
12.8. Intermolecular Forces 390
Chapter 13 Properties of Gases 393
13.1. Pressure of a Gas 393
13.2. Temperature Dependence of Gas Pressure 395
13.3. Formula Expressing Gay-Lussac’s Law 396
13.4. Gay-Lussac’s Law from the Point of View of Molecular Theory 397
13.5. Variation of Gas Temperature with a Change in Its Volume. Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes 398
13.6. Boyle’s Law 400
13.7. Formula Expressing Boyle’s Law 402
13.8. The Graph Representing Boyle’s Law 403
13.9. Relation between the Gas Density and Pressure 403
13.10. Molecular Interpretation of Boyle’s Law 404
13.11. Variation of Gas Volume with Temperature 405
13.12. Charles’ Law 406
13.13. Graphs Representing Gay-Lussac’s and Charles’ Laws 407
13.14. Thermodynamic Temperature 408
13.15. Gas Thermometer 410
13.16. Gas Volume and Thermodynamic Temperature 411
13.17. Temperature Dependence of Gas Density 411
13.18. Equation of State for a Gas 412
13.19. Dalton’s Law 413
13.20. Density of Gases 415
13.21. Avogadro’s Law 416
13.22. Mole. Avogadro’s Number 417
13.23. Velocities of Gas Molecules 418
13.24. Measurement of Velocities of Gas Molecules(Stern’s Experiment) 422
13.25. Specific Heat Capacities of Gases 424
13.26. Molar Heat Capacities 425
13.27. The Dulong and Petit Law 426
Chapter 14 Properties of Liquids 428
14.1. Structure of Liquids 428
14.2. Surface Energy 429
14.3. Surface Tension 433
14.4. Liquid Films 436
14.5. Temperature Dependence of Surface Tension 438
14.6. Wetting and Nonwetting 438
14.7. Arrangement of Molecules at the Surface of Bodies 441
14.8. The Role of the Curvature of the Free Surface of a Liquid 442
14.9. Capillary Phenomena 446
14.10. The Height to Which a Liquid Rises in Capillary Tubes 448
14.11. Adsorption 450
14.12. Floatation 451
14.13. Dissolution of Gases 453
14.14. Mutual Solubility of Liquids 455
14.15. Dissolution of Solids in Liquids 456
Chapter 15 Properties of Solids. Transition from Solid to Liquid State 458
15.1. Introduction 458
15.2. Crystalline Bodies 458
15.3. Amorphous Bodies 462
15.4. Crystal Lattice 463
15.5. Crystallisation 466
15.6. Melting and Solidification 467
15.7. Specific Latent Heat of Fusion 468
15.8. Supercooling 470
15.9. The Change in the Density of a Substance during Fusion 471
15.10. Polymers 472
15.11. Alloys 475
15.12. Solidification of Solutions 477
15.13. Cooling Mixtures 477
15.14. Variation of Properties of a Solid 478
Chapter 16 Elasticity and Strength 480
16.1. Introduction 480
16.2. Elastic and Plastic Deformations 480
16.3. Hooke’s Law 481
16.4. Extension and Compression 482
16.5. Shear 484
16.6. Torsion 485
16.7. Bending 487
16.8. Strength 489
16.9. Hardness 490
16.10. What Occurs during Deformations of Bodies? 491
16.11. Energy Variation during Deformations of Bodies 491
Chapter 17 Properties of Vapours 493
17.1. Introduction 493
17.2. Saturated and Unsaturated Vapour 493
17.3. Variation of Volume of Liquid and Saturated Vapour 495
17.4. Dalton’s Law for Vapours 497
17.5. Molecular Pattern of Evaporation 498
17.6. Temperature Dependence of Saturated Vapour Pressure 499
17.7. Boiling 500
17.8. Specific Latent Heat of Vaporisation 504
17.9. Cooling during Evaporation 507
17.10. The Change in the Internal Energy during a Transition of a Substance from the Liquid State to Vapour 508
17.11. Evaporation from Curved Surfaces of Liquids 509
17.12. Superheating of a Liquid 510
17.13. Supersaturation of Vapours 511
17.14. Vapour Saturation in Sublimation 512
17.15. Liquefaction of Gases 513
17.16. Critical Temperature 514
17.17. Liquefaction of Gases in Engineering 517
17.18. Vacuum Technology 520
17.19. Water Vapour in the Atmosphere 521
Chapter 18 Physics of the Atmosphere 525
18.1. The Atmosphere 525
18.2. Heat Balance of the Earth 526
18.3. Adiabatic Processes in the Atmosphere 527
18.4. Clouds 528
18.5. Artificial Precipitation 530
18.6. Wind 530
18.7. Weather Forecasting 532
Chapter 19 Heat Engines 534
19.1. Necessary Conditions for the Operation of Heat Engines 534
19.2. Steam Power Plant 535
19.3. Steam Boiler 536
19.4. Steam Turbine 537
19.5. Steam Piston Engine 539
19.6. Condenser 540
19.7. Efficiency of Heat Engines 541
19.8. Efficiency of a Steam Power Plant 541
19.9. Petrol Internal Combustion Engine 543
19.10. Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines 547
19.11. Diesel Engine 548
19.12. Jet Engines 549
19.13. Heat Transfer from a Cold to a Hot Body 550
Answers and Solutions 553
Index 556
Back Jacket 568
Back Cover 569

 

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3 Responses to Elementary Textbook on Physics Vol 1 – Landsberg

  1. Lisanework Asfaw says:

    Thanks a lot.Happy X-Mas season. When do you post manual of handbook of higher mathematics?Thanks ahead.

    • The Mitr says:

      Handbook of Higher Mathematics by Vygodsky and Handbook of Physics (Modern + Original) by Yavorsky and Detlafwill be posted soon.

  2. opto_abhi says:

    I can’t express enough thanks to you!
    I believe sharing knowledge is the new revolution!

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